Review of The Betrayal by Jerry B. Jenkins

Standard

Genre: Mystery/Crime Fiction

Recommended.

This is a lighthearted, easy read and would be appropriate for teen readers as well asĀ adults. Detective Boone Drake of the Chicago Police Department is celebrated as a hero after leading a sting that will take down the leaders of some massive street gangs. But a couple days before the case goes to trial, their star informant and witness is nearly gunned down (Boone playing the hero again by taking the bullet). It seems there must be a leak within the Police Department and Boone is determined to find the mole even though the culprit is likely amongst those he most respects. In the midst of his investigation, recovery, and personal life, Boone must decide who he can trust.

This book has just the right amount of suspense, mystery, and innocent romance. The characters are personable, and the story line is believable. My only criticism is that the story begins after the sting and readers are given only a short prologue to the history of the case at hand. I would have liked more development of the crime scene and the gang characters–especially of the prime witness, Pascual Candelario. The story moves smoothly once it is underway, but I did have some questions in the beginning. I later discovered that this is the second book of a trilogy, so perhaps it would have been helpful to read The Brotherhood first. But, even on its own, I found The Betrayal relaxing and enjoyable; it’s great reading for a rainy day, or any other time!

I received a complimentary copy of this ARC as a part of the Tyndale Blog Network.

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest

Review of Thunder Dog by Michael Hingson with Susy Flory

Standard

Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Recommended.

Thunder Dog is the true account of a blind man and his guide dog as they escape the 78th floor of the North Tower of the World Trade Center. Inspired by the calm and collectiveness of his dog, Michael was able to keep his focus and emotions in tact as they make the long descend to freedom.

This isn’t just a story of September 11. Intermixed within the main story, the author shares his experience growing up blind. It’s also the story of the bond and trust between him and his guide dog, Roselle. Their story of teamwork and trust is an inspiring glimpse of the spiritual bond Christian’s have (or should have) with God.

Reading this account helped me emotionally connect to the events of 9/11 in a way I previously hadn’t. I’m typically pretty rational, and tend to focus on the big picture. Michael brings us inside his story to feel with him and others as they braved this huge tragedy. Most touching to me was how Michael describes meeting the courageous firefighters as they ran up the stairs toward impending destruction. This is a touching and encouraging story.

I received a complimentary copy of this book as a part of the Thomas Nelson Book Review Blogging Program through booksneeze.com.

facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest